Under the Maple Tree

Mother Culture: Notes on A Biblical Home Education, Chapter Three: Science

From December 6, 2012

Friends,

Once again, Jacki has blessed us with her organizational talents and shared her notes on our discussion and observations from our Charlotte Mason meeting.  If you are new to our little spot here “Under the Maple Tree” then, please join our little group.  You will find details here about this actual and virtual support group and our previous notes on the blog site under the tag “Mother Culture”.  In short, we meet as a small support group to learn from one another and a good book as well as to encourage and spur one another on in this crazy homeschooling life.  This year our book of choice is A Biblical Home Education by Dr. Ruth Beechick.  If you are interested in joining us even if only virtually, then the book is available through Maple Tree.  Contact me, Cori, for ordering information.

If you are following our little group online or if you missed the meeting in person or if you were here and wanted to look over the ideas and resources that we discussed then please enjoy the notes below with thanks again to the talented Jacki Young.  There are so many great ideas, information and suggestions here that you might want to check back here for a reference here and there.
 
Blessings,
Cori

 ___________
 Chapter 3 – Science to Match the Bible

(p.41) Ruth Beechick states that homeschooling parents seem to “fear science more than any other subject”  (Do you really think that that is the case?)
o As homeschooling parents, we don’t always remember learning the materials we are now teaching. It is difficult to teach materials that we aren’t familiar with
o Many “traditional” teachers don’t invite students to ask questions. Beechick advises that priority should be given to having students ask questions and seek answers. “If you spend more time on space and less time on insects, it is fine as long as children are learning to ask questions and seek answers” (p. 52)
o Many science students and in fact, science professionals, have to hide their creationist stance or risk losing the respect of friends or colleagues
o Good resources like Apologia help to manage the fear of teaching science

(p.55) “Some `readers’ may not enjoy what we call hands-on science activities. Other students may seem more balanced between learning from reading and learning from activities.” How do we know that our “readers” understand the scientific concepts they are reading about?
o Discussion shows understanding of concepts
o Narrating shows understanding of concepts
o Jonathan Park CDs have been shown to teach concepts well

Should we focus on doing dissections with our children as part of learning science?
o Can buy “shrink wrapped” creatures for dissection
o Can easily obtain creatures in our “own backyard” eg. Cori’s dead fish anatomy lesson 😉 (We were camping and found a “science lesson” on the beach.)
o Can extract skeleton of creature by burying near an anthill to speed up decomposition.  That sounds like a science lesson in itself!)
o Can euthanize creatures humanely with baking soda and vinegar.  This is what snake owners often to with rodents that they keep to feed to their pets.
o Some households not comfortable bringing in “dead bodies” due to sanitary concerns or because “life is precious”.  This is reasonable.  Charlotte Mason didn’t see the need for school children to do dissections needlessly.

Some resources for teaching science in primary grades
o Usborne early science books – series of 4-5 books on plants, fish, etc.
o Burgess Bird Book for Children
o Pagoo by Holling C. Holling and other Holling C.Holling books
o Christian Liberty Nature Readers – beginning reader for science topics
o “Apples, Bubbles & Crystals” teaches science as it goes through the alphabet.  This is a fun resource for young students.
o Field guides
o Handbook of Nature Study by Comstock
o “I Wonder Why” books
o DVDs
o Simple activities are helpful
§ Eg. Paint with lemon juice and put in the oven to make painting visible
§ Jance VanCleave book for simple science activities to be done from your kitchen

What is the difference between Babylonians and Sumerians? (p.45)

How did the calendar come to be?
o Calendar Quest by Jennifer Johnson Garrity

Other good resources recommended by HS Freebies website: www.homeschoolfreebie.com

How do I do science experiments at home?
o Apologia kits – don’t have to buy the kit to do the experiments
o For chemistry, some basic materials needed ie. Microscope, Bunsen burner
o If using Apologia check out www.donnayoung.org for schedules for completing the books

ApologiaGeneral Science curriculum

Red Wagon Tutorials – previous years on USB for $120 (Are there copyrights to consider here?)

Some important considerations to apply to home school science:
o Focus on teaching younger children what they’re interested in, and teaching middle & high school students what they need to know for their future plans
o Teach children to think for themselves & take responsibility for their own work
o Do science as a family group
o Talk together about what is learned so siblings have something in common and can learn from each other

(P. 58)”Science students can usually learn from any ol’ book”
o Are illustrations, colour and design wasted on “science minded” students?
o Science minded students will learn science regardless of the colour and design qualities

Nature Study

Project FeederWatch to learn about birds in your backyard. Submit data on birds visiting your backyard feeder to Cornell during the winter months
Country Diary of Edwardian Lady – a naturalist’s diary from 1906
Engage grandparents – you may be surprised how much knowledge and interest they have
Books by Susanna Moody & Catherine Parr Traillm (for older children and adults)
o Catherine Parr Traill’s “Backwoods of Canada” describes a naturalists experience emigrating from England to Canada
Local resources such as Eleanora’s Diary – journals of a Canadian pioneer girl
AGO
Great Canadian ArtPak by Cyndy Regeling
James Herriot – Childrens’ Treasury and other stories
Burgess Book series
Clare Walker Leslie’s “Keeping a Nature Journal” – suggests journaling topics through the seasons, sketching tips, and how to teach nature journaling

Notes


1) A couple resources to add to the last meeting’s topic of “History”:
o Series of accordion style history timelines @ Coles/Chapters/Indigo ie. “The Timechart History of the World”, “The Timechart History of Jewish Civilization”, etc.; very thorough and detailed ($19.99 each)
o Timeline of World History poster @ Creation.com incorporates Bible history and “secular”; gives high level look for reasonable price ($2 small, $6 large)
2) How to explain to “traditional schoolers” that our children always get an A? If the student hasn’t mastered a subject, we don’t move on!
3) Article on Finlandschools:  Why Are Finnish Kids So Smart?
Standardized testing has negative consequences on curriculum and teachers
Teaching in Finlandis prestigious career with good pay, high educational requirements (3 years masters) and high level of competition for jobs
Teachers focus on what’s best for students, not what will make them better than other students

Method to this Madness

I don’t usually take the time to blog during daylight hours,certainly not in the morning.  Morning is our time of concentrated learning.  We have a routine that we follow and this year we have really been enjoying our learning times in the morning.  This week is a bit more relaxed though and so I thought I would take a few minutes to write. 

This week has become a tradition in the Dean house: it’s “January Reno Week”.  Over the past few years our good daddy has booked a week off in January to be Mr. Fixit.  He usually takes the time to catch up on the “Honey Do” list and to focus on one area of the house that needs some special attention.  This year it is some much needed repairs to our basement bathroom, specifically a leaky shower.  Big job.

It’s nice that some of the girls are now old enough that they can be quite involved in the project and as such we have modified their school schedules for this week.  So, as I write, one daughter is downstairs helping with and learning about plumbing, another is writing a letter to Grandma, and another is making cookies to bring to Awana on Wednesday night.  The little one is creating her daily painted masterpiece.  Peaceful. 

As I enjoy this relaxed learning time I have been reflecting on our goals for the year.  You see, every year in the Dean home we make learning goals.  I have noticed over the past few years a divergence between our long term goals (about things like virtue, compassion, and work ethic) and our yearly short term goals (about things like math and spelling and science).  So this year we decided on four subjects that we thought would best integrate the short term and long term goals…

This year all of our learning is focused on these four topics: love for God, love for family, love for others, and love for learning.  So while writing to Grandma will fulfill the need for writing, spelling and grammar lessons, it is most importantly a means of loving others.  While painting is a wonderful creative thing for a preschooler to do, it is primarily a manifestation of the beauty that they Creator has instilled in the heart of a child.  We learn to love God by all that is beautiful in this world.  Learning plumbing is very useful life skill but is above all a method of being able to love and care for our family.

So, while not all days have this relaxed pace, and while it’s not all roses, (We have had the chance to learn about reacting with grace when our beads spill all over the floor this morning!) we are enjoying the day to day method to this madness.  It reminds me of what I have been reading in Charlotte Mason’s books lately…
“Method implies two things – a way to an end, and step-by-step progress in that way.  Further, the following of a method implies an idea, a mental image, of the end or object to be arrived at.  What do you propose that education shall effect in and for your child?  Again, method is natural; easy, yielding, unobtrusive, simple as the ways of Nature herself; yet, watchful, careful, all-pervading, all-compelling.  Method, with the end of education in view, presses the most unlikely matters into service to bring about that end; but with no more tiresome mechanism that the sun employs when it makes the winds to blow and the waters to flow only by shining.” (Home Education, p. 8)

Friends, what do you purpose that education shall effect in and for your child?  I hope that as you search out your purpose in education that you will find it as natural to learn together as a family as it is to enjoy the sun on your faces.  We continue to strive for this depth and this simplicity rolled into one.

Have a great week!

Cori


www.mapletreepublications.ca

32 Pairs of Socks

For Christmas my family tends to get practical things in their stockings as well as an orange and a candy or two.  Fairly predictable.  More often than not, this means that Christmas time is a time to restock on socks.  And, boy, did we need socks!  It seems that we are constantly rifling through the clean laundry looking for a pair of socks for the day.  How nice to feel like we are restocked and spoilt again in the New Year. 

But here is the catch, as I sat trying to catch up on the laundry this past week, reveling in how nice it is to be healthy again (after sharing all together in being dragged down by a horrible cold/flu virus all through the holidays), I realized that maybe I had erred in the sock purchases over the holidays.  You see, I sat for a quite moment – probably a good half hour – and sorted out half a dozen piles of “what belongs to who” and then proceeded to start the pairing…  I paired up Hubby’s socks and tucked them away, then I folded mine.  32 pairs of socks.  No, not his and mine.  I folded 32 pairs of my socks.  Really?  Do I really have 32 pairs of socks…. And that would also imply that it’s been a month since I last folded socks…  And that it will also likely be another month before I am sufficiently motivated to fold socks again.  Sigh!

How often is my life like this?  I invest time, or energy, space, or money in something that is meant to help or simplify life and yet makes no difference or a negative one.  I was thinking this when I considered other things in my little world too.  How often have we “needed” a new book or curriculum that only seemed to make us busier but not smarter?  How often have I stuck with an old activity while adding a new one on to our already busy schedule and hoped to be able to fit it all in? 

I know that New Years is a time for resolutions and reflections but I don’t tend to like to follow the crowd and don’t want to make these grand commitments to change just because everyone else is.  I do however want to continually be striving to be all that God created me – and my family – to be so New Years is as good a time as any to strengthen my resolve.      

So I am strengthening my resolve to strive for the purpose and simplicity that we set out for so long ago in our family life.  I want to constantly question why we do things and how we could do them better.  In our school this year, that has meant lightening some of our work load to be able to focus on other things.  Namely, we chose to take a break from reading and writing curriculums so that we could spend more time just reading and writing.  Sounds simple, I know, but it has been revolutionary.  The kids and I are so enjoying just reading a lot together.  It’s been fun to take the time to make cards, write letters, to teach them to blog and to write out their thoughts on the things that they are learning, to listen to a beautiful poem or Bible verse or saying and to set it aside for later to be copied and kept.

Now, as I try to jam my 32 pairs of socks into a too-small drawer, I am reflecting on other ways to keep it simple in areas that I tend to invite the complicated, ways to redeem wasted moments that could be used more wisely.  I think that one thing we will do is to read our Bible more, to simply enjoy it as literature with our other readings rather than parsing the meanings to death.  Teaching my children to view the world through a biblical lens can only be enhanced by reading the Bible more and discussing all of life in light of the living word of scripture.  It seems to me like a spectacular way to continue to “throw off everything that hinders” so that we can “run with perseverance the race that is marked out for us” knowing that to “fix our eyes on Jesus” (Hebrews 12:1,2) will only bring us closer to that ideal that we strive for.

Blessings, Friends, as you strive to be all that you were created to be in 2013!

Happy New Year,

Cori

www.mapletreepublications.ca
mapletreepublications@sympatico.ca
905-778-9412

Mother Culture: Notes on A Biblical Home Education, Chapter Two: History


from November 1, 2012

 

Friends, even with the help of the wonderfully efficient and organized Jacki Young, I have been negligent in getting these notes to you.  If you are new to our little spot here “Under the Maple Tree” then please join our little group.  You will find details here about this actual and virtual support group and our first set of notes here.  In short, we meet as a small support group to learn from one another and a good book as well as to encourage and spur one another on in this crazy homeschooling life.  This year our book of choice is A Biblical Home Education by Dr. Ruth Beechick.  If you are interested in joining us even if only virtually, then the book is available through Maple Tree.  Contact me, Cori, for ordering information.

 

If you are following our little group online, or if you missed the meeting in person, or if you were here and wanted to look over the ideas and resources that we discussed then please enjoy the notes below with thanks to the great Jacki Young.

 

——————

 

Beechick writes, “We must match history to the Bible – not only its timeline and chronology, but also the principles and the meanings we attach to it.” (p.23)

 

It is difficult to find resources that integrate Bible with history. Here are some suggestions:

o www.dianawaring.com – “Ancient Civilizations” curriculum and other resources for integrating Bible and History

o History resources from Simplecharlottemason.com

o A Story of the World – keep in mind that the Bible is treated as literature, not as core

o www.jonathanpark.com – Jonathan Parks CDs

o Mystery of History – in this curriculum the Bible isn’t just integrated but is the core of history

 

Beechick encourages us to “resist the hype” i.e. set realistic goals for history (p.39)

o Don’t try to do too many activities; rather, focus on the reading

o Notebooking and reading work well with multiple age levels

 

There are benefits to reading in short spurts or in longer chunks

o Good to stop before seeing the “glazed look” in their eyes

o Leave them wanting more and excited to see what happens when reading is resumed

o Reading for longer chunks allows more depth of study

 

There are many benefits to using extra-Biblical sources to study Ancient history:

o Helps us understand that the world is bigger than Biblical history

o Integrates Bible and History to help us see parallels – things happening at the same time in different places in world

o Helps to lend credibility to Bible

o Helps to give place in history

o Artifacts also give credibility to Bible

o Shows the contradictions between the Bible and History eg. we know from the Bible that people were made smart (no cavemen); this contradicts common “History”

o We need the whole picture to argue our point eg. To discuss evolution vs the Bible

o Enables us to stand up for our beliefs even if persecuted

o If we can stand up for our beliefs, we will “stand before kings”:

“Seest thou a man diligent in his business? He shall stand before kings; he shall not stand before mean men. ” Proverbs 22:29

 

Today, history is not necessarily taught in society; instead, an “individual history” is emphasized

o Charlotte Mason thought history should be taught so that students could “think justly of what is occurring today” (“Home Education”, p. 169)

o Understanding history helps us to be less self-focused

 
Where should a homeschooling parent start with history? Some suggestions:

o My Father’s World website www.mfwbooks.com

§ Integrates Bible and “History”

§ Can be too repetitive depending on your style/taste

o Mystery of History (available through Maple Tree)

o 50 Famous Stories by James Baldwin – stories of heroes & famous men (available as a free ebook or on www.librivox.org for free audio download)

o An Island Story by H.E. Marshall (Recommended on Amblesideonline.org) (also available free online)

o “Trial and Triumph” by R. Hannula – stories of heroes of church history

 
Building a timeline

o Create a timeline (either on the wall or “Book of Centuries”)

– some suggested delaying timelines until grade 3 and later while others started them earlier

o Various websites can help you make one eg. Knowledgequest.com

o Cori has made a timeline book; request the file if you are interested

o Simplycharlottemason.com has 2 versions of a “book of centuries”. One is free, while the other costs but includes categories ie. Art, culture, religion, etc.

 
For good history book lists, refer to the following resources:

o Through the Ages by Christine Miller

o Amblesideonline.org

o Sonlight.com

o Cmhelp.com

o Greenleaf Press

o A Story of the World

o Heartofwisdom.com (Biblical history)

o Classicalhomeschooling.org
o See also great series like Our Canadian Girl, the Dear Canada diary series, and the Canadian Flyer series for Canadian history
 

Beechick’s categorization of history differs from most. It is not divided according to Jesus life/death:

1) Early Times (Creation – Abraham)

2) Kingdom of Israel(Father Abraham – Fall of Judah)

3) Gentile Kingdoms (Captivity of Israel & Judah – God’s kingdom on Earth)

According to Beechick, the statue from Nebuchadnezzar’s dream in Daniel 2 “shows the whole history of the Gentile world from Babylon through to the kingdom of Christ” (p.32-33)

o This image is also studied in Precept Bible Studies for kids by Kay Arthur

 

We also took some time to discuss Living books and in short these are some of the notes that we had on them.

 

Living Books

 

What are living books?

o Whole books written by a single author where the subject is a “favourite” of author. We can share the author’s enthusiasm for the topic as we read. (S. Schaeffer McCauley)

o Special interest books that could be fiction or non-fiction (K. Andreola)

o A simple test of a good book is if kids are interested after reading one page (K. Andreola)

 
Some examples of living books:

o Apologia books

o Andrew Lang fairy books

o Trailblazer Books by Dave & Neta Jackson (unfortunately out of print) *Maple Tree has found a few of these still available new – let me know if you would like a title or two.

o Check out www.amblesideonline.orgfor excellent reading lists of living books.

o See also Honey for a Child’s Heart by Gladys Hunt and Books Children Love to Read by Elizabeth Wilson for excellent living book bibliographies.
 
Well, there are a few notes to get you started friends. :) I’m again looking forward to hearing some feedback. To those of you who were there, is there anything we missed? I’m sure there are more resources you can recommend.  If you weren’t there, what are your thoughts? What were the take away lessons that have challenged you or have helped in your home school recently? Please try to post your comments directly on the blog (rather than replying if you are receiving this as an email) so that we can all participate in the conversation.
 
I will try to get the notes to you for Decemeber’s meeting in the next few days and am looking forward to seeing some of you in person later this week!
 
Blessings,
 
Cori 
 
Maple Tree Publications
905-778-9412 

Christmas Blessings

Dear Friends,

I have finally dusted off my laptop to send you a few words of greeting over these beautiful holidays.  First I want to send my wishes that you have had a spectacular Christmas with friends and family and to wish your New Year will be filled with God’s richest blessings.

I have to admit that I have been feeling a bit sorry for myself lately.  We are finally starting to see the end of a horrible bout of cold and flu that has been with us for more than three weeks.  I have been stuck in the past wishing for a White Christmas and a repeat of the idyllic holidays of many years gone by but these days Christmas has been a visit to his mom’s and then my mom’s and then my dad’s and … well you get it.  This year, it’s been a few of us visiting with one pocket of loved ones or another hoping tentatively for peace and having to leave one or more sickies at home. 

This holiday has taken an extra striving to recall the point of it all.  It is so easy to lose the sound of the still small voice of the baby in the manger.  But we have found our Christmas in the moments.  Friends, I hope you have found your moments as well. 

We loved the moments of our advent readings even if, yes, we didn’t finish them all.  I was touched by my husband’s reflections and patience when I was too stressed with lists and cards and bills to see through to the Jesus who had made it all so special.

I enjoyed discussions with my daughters about the gifts that they had for Jesus.  So neat to walk my seven year old through why Jesus didn’t take the beautiful card that she made for Him and set under the tree.  “Where does Jesus live daughter?”  “In heaven.”  “Where else?”  “With us, here in our house, in my heart.”  “So, he kept his precious gift here where he lives.  No?”  We discussed how he says that when we do for others we are doing for Him.  We discussed the gifts that we gave especially to Him when we gave to others.

Another special moment with Jesus was in a new tradition that we started last year: a cake, candles, and “Happy Birthday” to Jesus.  My oldest daughter loves to bake and makes wonderful cakes.  This year she really wanted Jesus to have a cookie monster birthday cake.  We put six candles in and after singing to Him we each blew out a candle and gave him a birthday gift of words, “Thank you Jesus for giving me my family!”  “Thank you Jesus for taking care of us.”  “I am so glad, Jesus, that you are so much smarter than I am.”  Last year we chose out gifts for Jesus on Christmas day from the Samaritan’s Purse catalogue, each giving of their own money.  This year, we pooled our resources and were able to give to Jesus in another fun and creative way.  What a treat!

Still wrapped in the busyness even last night (since you can’t finish Christmas cards when everyone is sick for three weeks in December and we are finally starting to catch up on some of those visits that we cancelled) I received another sweet gift from my Saviour: a note from a friend.  It is such a blessing to have friends who are there at just the right moments.  So neat to see that Jesus is there to bless me in so many ways: through little thoughtful notes, and through the huge sacrificial gift of coming as a vulnerable boy to be my Saviour from all that I deserve.  It’s so hard to comprehend.  Perhaps that is why I can only handle it in small moments.

Friends, I hope that you have had that idyllic time of Christmas wonder and enjoyed this amazing time of reverence for our Jesus but if you have been, like me, seeking at least the little moments, may this magical time between Christmas and New Years be a time of you to rest in Him and to know His peace in a new way.

Happy New Year, Friends!

Cori

More of Fred

One thing that I have planned to do saw to try to do better at sharing new products with you and to let you know what you might find on Maple Tree’s store shelves. 

Most of you are aware that, in addition to the {spectacular} resources that we publish ourselves for the Canadian home school community, we also carry several other great resources that either we, in our little home school, have used or our customers have highly recommended.

If you are new to this little space Under the Maple Tree however, you may not know that we carry Life of Fred Math books

***If you do know about Fred, then please scroll down and take a look as there have recently been several new books added to the series that you may be interested in!***

If you are new to Fred, then let me introduce you!

As a long time math tutor and teacher (of about 20 years!) there was never a math curriculum that I really loved until I met Fred!  Life of Fred Math is so different than any other math curriculum than you will find out there. 

What makes Life of Fred special:

Life of Fred is a fun story, not a dull textbook.  Every mathematical concept is introduced and reinforced in the telling of the story – and it’s a silly, fun whimsical story.  This makes math time so much more pleasurable than it ever could be with a textbook and work book approach.  If ever there was a “living math” curriculum, this is it!

Life of Fred is relevant.  I always hated it when kids came to me for tutoring and could not understand why certain mathematical concepts were useful.  As much as we would go over them and look at the practicalities of what they were learning it just wasn’t reinforced in the teaching that most books or teachers gave.  In the Life of Fred series, Fred always encounters the concepts that the student is learning in “real life” before the concept is taught.  This helps students to know that what they are learning actually has a purpose.

Life of Fred is comprehensive.  While many families chose to use Life of Fred to supplement the curriculum that they are already using, it is also a comprehensive curriculum that can stand on its own and can teach your child all that they need to know in math right from earliest grade school on through to university level learning.

Life of Fred is easy for busy homeschooling families to use.  The books are meant to be used independently with no parental preparation.  As long as students can read, they can do their work on their own.  For younger students, they only need the story read to them, there is no other work that the parent needs to do.

– Life of Fred is cheap!  I know that many of you can relate to me on these terms: as homeschoolers we need to be very careful about where and how we spend our meager budgets.  Life of Fred books are made with hard covers and with a high quality binding.  They are non-consumable.  The prices for Life of Fred books have come down as they have become more popular and you will only ever have to buy one copy for your family.  And Maple Tree pricing is very competitive: when you take into account the cost of the books, shipping, taxes, duties and exchange, you won’t likely find Life of Fred books cheaper in Canada than you will here.  (Let me know if you do!)

Last year, around this time, I shared with you that the author had finally released the Elementary Series making the full curriculum complete.  Since then, he has received feedback that parents and students want more Fred and so he has obliged us with supplementary materials. 

(Below I will try to briefly outline what is available.  For more complete descriptions and pricing please see my website though I appreciate your patience as not all of the new materials are on my website yet.  You can check out samples here.)

Life of Fred Elementary Series
Life of Fred: Apples
Life of Fred: Butterflies
Life of Fred: Cats
Life of Fred: Dogs
Life of Fred: Edgewood
Life of Fred: Farming
Life of Fred: Goldfish
Life of Fred: Honey
Life of Fred: Ice Cream
Life of Fred: Jelly Beans

*This series is recommended for any student that is in grades one to four or who is not able to do adding, subtracting, multiplying AND long division competently.  The author recommends that all students in this category start with Apples regardless of their previous math experience. 

I agree as the way that he teaches the concepts brings a unique understanding to the topics rather than a focus on memorization and drilling.  Older students will go through these books quite a bit faster than younger ones.  As an example, I started both my middle daughters on the Apples book last year and the older one (in grade four) completed eight books while the younger one (in grade one) completed three of them in one school year.* 

***Life of Fred Intermediate Series*** NEW
Life of Fred: Kidneys
Life of Fred: Liver
Life of Fred: Mine Shaft

*When Dr. Schmidt published the Elementary Series last year he said that it was all that was needed to prepare a student to start the “Before High School” series below.  He has recently added these titles to his publications and recommends that they are used by students that need extra practice after finishing the elementary series and who aren’t quite ready for the next series (i.e. they aren’t strong enough in their adding, subtracting, multiplying and long division skills). 

Dr. Schmidt also recommends using this series if the student goes through the elementary series quickly and has not yet started grade five.*

***(If you are looking to purchase this series through Maple Tree, please email as it has not yet been catalogued on the website.  These titles will be available in early December 2012.)***
Life of Fred Before High School Series
Life of Fred: Fractions

Life of Fred: Decimals and Percents
***Life of Fred: Elementary Physics*** NEW
Life of Fred: Pre-Algebra 1 with Biology
Life of Fred: Pre-Algebra 2 with Economics
 
*This series is for students that are at least in grade five though they may start the Fractions book in older grades as well.  It is recommended that all students starting this series start with the Fractions book whether they are in grade five or grade eight and that they are able to competently do adding, subtracting, multiplying and long division.*
 
***Recently Dr. Schmidt added the Elementary Physics book to this series and it fits right into the middle of the series.  Again, he decided that the series was complete with four titles however the rate that students were going through the books and the feedback asking for extra practice prompted him to produce this book which is meant to reinforce the learning that students have done to this point in the series.  (If you are looking to purchase this series on my website, please email me if you would like the Elementary Physics book added to your order as it has not yet been catalogued on the website.)***
 
Life of Fred High School Series
Life of Fred: Beginning Algebra
Fred’s Home Companion: Beginning Algebra
***Zillions of Practice Problems for Beginning Algebra*** NEW
Life of Fred: Advanced Algebra
Fred’s Home Companion: Advanced Algebra
Life of Fred: Geometry
City Answers: Geometry
Life of Fred: Trigonometry
Fred’s Home Companion: Trigonometry
 
*These titles are all at the high school level.  The companion books are available for three of the titles and are used to divide the chapters in individual lessons.  They also contain extra questions and solutions.* 
 
***Please note that the new title Zillions of Practice Problems… was recently added to the high school series line up when the author was asked for extra practice problems because, as he explains it, parents were saying, “We want tons of problems along with completely worked out solutions…  My kids are not crying when they read Fred—how could they be learning math without crying?”  If you are currently using Beginning Algebra and want extra practice problems for your kids then this is the book for you.  If you are planning to invest in Beginning Algebra then consider whether you might want to supplement with this book.  (If you are looking to purchase Zillions…, please email me as it has not yet been catalogued on the website.)***
 
Life of Fred University Series
Life of Fred: Calculus
City Answers: Calculus
Life of Fred: Statistics
City Answers: Statistics
Life of Fred: Linear Algebra
City Answers: Linear Algebra
 
*These are upper level high school or university level books.*
 
I never want to sell anyone a book that they don’t want and so I want to also let you know some of the drawbacks to this series:
– Some moms have told me that their kids don’t like to read.  If you kids don’t like to read stories then they might not enjoy Fred.
Some students don’t want fun and silly to come anywhere near their math books.  Some kids just like to work through problem sets.  Life of Fred isn’t the book for them.
– Some parents want more practice problems for their students.  Dr. Schmidt is working to produce extra practice sets for many of the books that are now available.  Other than these there are many avenues to find the extra problems that you need and many of them are free.  Hopefully, in a later post I will share a few of these resources with you.  Until then, I just like to encourage parents that it’s easy to find a few extra problems to go with your child’s Life of Fred lesson.  It isn’t easy to find fun, relevant and passionate applications to the many long problem sets that most other curriculums provide.
 
I hope that this {brief} description of the Life of Fred series gives you enough of an idea of what it is like and whether it would be of any use to your family.  I would be happy to answer any other questions that you might have about these books if you think that they might be helpful in your home school.
 
Blessings, Friends!
 
Cori
 
 
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